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Invelos Forums->Posts by movie_madness Page: 1  Previous   Next
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The cellphone addiction is depicted nicely in this 2013 viral video that got 50 million views.  The lady in the first shot made this video, which shows that everywhere she goes, she sees people who are stuck to their little screens.
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Topic Replies: 24, Topic Views: 995
Quoting 69samael69:
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Out of curiosity, has the user base shrunk? I've notice the last year or so that I've been getting a lot more content that I have to enter myself, especially for box sets and collections. Maybe I'm just unlucky.


The user base has never been big to begin with, as this is a niche hobby after all.  Even if movie-collecting isn't a niche, movie-collecting in large quantity to the point that you need software to manage it is definitely a niche thing to do.

Missing titles and missing info in existing titles in the DVDP database have always been a problem.  That's why a few years ago I created my own movie collection using software and techniques that I designed, including the ability to import cast and crew data from IMDb automatically and programmatically, the ability to look up my collection anywhere on the web (cloud feature), the ability to use unicode characters, etc.  I've posted about this on this forum, so check my post history for detail. 

With all the missing info on DVDP and the need for you to do your own entries, at times you feel like you are the one creating the database, not Invelos and the contributors.  So you might as well create one on your own, which is what I did.  If you have programming skills, definitely give this a consideration. 

I also imported all of Leonard Maltin's reviews into my database so they appear whenever I access a title. 
I even put in "disc-specific" cast & crew, such as the people who do audio commentaries, interviews, or any content outside of the movie itself that I deem important enough to be searched for.  In fact, I can put in ANY info I want in the way I want.  And that's because I have the database structure I want.  That happens to be another reason why I ditched DVDP: because its database structure has some major limitations.  I mentioned this in detail in my older posts also.
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Topic Replies: 26, Topic Views: 1610
Quoting Lowpro:
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Quoting movie_madness:
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Quoting Lowpro:
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DVD Profiler isn't dead or hibernating as far as I'm concerned.  It does a more than respectful job of cataloging my physical DVD and Blu-ray collection and will continue to do so, irrespective of what updates may or may not come in the future.  I also have no interest in digital downloads.  I own 4,193 DVD's and Blu-ray's and have yet to redeem a single digital download.  For those that find value in digital downloads knock yourself out.  Color me not interested.  I have no interest in purchasing and cataloging digital downloads and no interest in discussions about digital downloads quite frankly.

Do you realize a lot of movies are available for online streaming or download only (in HD, to boot) and are not or has never been, or even never will be, on disc, let alone Blu-ray?  If you love old or non-mainstream movies, you must know this.  A lot of those titles are so obscure that disc releases are probably very unlikely.  That is especially true for Blu-ray, since Blu-rays are more expensive to make.  For instance, a ton of Shaw Brothers martial-art flicks have been released in *HD* on iTunes, Amazon, and Youtube.  Good luck waiting for Blu-rays for those titles.  They don't get or may never get Blu-ray releases even in their native Hong Kong.  Among western films, there are several Hitchcock silent films that are available for HD streaming, but no Blu-rays.  Then you have 20th Century Fox that celebrated its 100th anniversary by releasing 100 titles only digitally.  That's just at the top of my head; there are a lot more.  Just sign up Netflix for a month and you will find untold number of films and TV shows in HD streaming but not on Blu-ray and never will be.  I'm not telling you to give up discs, since I still buy lots of discs myself.  But DON'T IGNORE STREAMING just because of some silly personal principles.  Have an open mind and you will only benefit yourself, instead of limiting yourself only to discs, which will only result in you having fewer chances to see certain movies than you would otherwise.

I own over 4,000 DVD's and Blu-ray's.  Do you really think I need enlightened?  Please.  Of course I know there are titles which are only available via digital downloads and/or streaming, many of which may never see the light of day on DVD or Blu-ray.  Even so, there are still more titles available currently on DVD and Blu-ray than I'll ever have the time to watch in my lifetime, not to mention any future DVD and Blu-ray releases, both catalog titles and new releases.  That being said, I'd really suggest you read my words more careful.  Don't ignore streaming because of my silly principles?  Have an open mind and I'll benefit myself?  Really?  What I said was that I have no interest in "purchasing" and cataloging digital downloads.  That type of "collecting" doesn't interest me.  If I miss out on various titles as a result so be it.  Worse case, I'm left with more time to enjoy other things in life.  As for streaming, I never even mentioned streaming.  For the record, I've been a member of Netflix since the service was first debuted, both for physical rentals and then streaming as well once it was offered, my use of streaming strictly limited to content not available for rent or purchase on DVD or Blu-ray.


So you care about movies enough to own 4000 discs, but when you can't download digital movies because of some silly principles, you suddenly say to yourself, I don't care, so be it.  If that is your argument, then you don't have an argument. 

And you still haven't answered why exactly you don't like to download movies. Is it because you don't like the technology, you don't have the Internet bandwidth, and/or you don't trust digital services? 

I'm old-school and buy discs just like all of you, but old dogs need to learn tricks too.  This video shows how older folks handle Netflix.


Quoting Lowpro:
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Quoting scotthm:
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Quoting widescreenforever:
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... lets face it  overall ., DVD sales are pretty well dead ...

thoughts?

While it's true that disc sales are declining, I wouldn't exactly call $5.4 Billion in sales (2016) a "dead" market.

Exactly.  Oh my.  Physical disc sales are declining.  Only $5,400,000,000 in sales last year.  Hardly even worth the bother.

Sales have been declining 5-10% every year for the last few years, and we are already seeing some of the effects.  Studios have been selling those crappy made-on-demand DVD-Rs for years now.  And whenever a 3D movie comes out, it usually does not come out on 3D Blu-ray, and you have to import foreign 3D Blu-ray editions instead.  Maybe you don't care, but the situation is indeed getting more and more dire as time goes on.  A lot more discs would probably have been released if it weren't for these dire situations.  And in movie forums there are always people asking why certain movies are not out on discs.  My friend, the only sadder thing than bad disc sales is someone who doesn't even want to admit sales are bad.
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Topic Replies: 56, Topic Views: 4935
Quoting Lowpro:
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DVD Profiler isn't dead or hibernating as far as I'm concerned.  It does a more than respectful job of cataloging my physical DVD and Blu-ray collection and will continue to do so, irrespective of what updates may or may not come in the future.  I also have no interest in digital downloads.  I own 4,193 DVD's and Blu-ray's and have yet to redeem a single digital download.  For those that find value in digital downloads knock yourself out.  Color me not interested.  I have no interest in purchasing and cataloging digital downloads and no interest in discussions about digital downloads quite frankly.


Do you realize a lot of movies are available for online streaming or download only (in HD, to boot) and are not or has never been, or even never will be, on disc, let alone Blu-ray?  If you love old or non-mainstream movies, you must know this.  A lot of those titles are so obscure that disc releases are probably very unlikely.  That is especially true for Blu-ray, since Blu-rays are more expensive to make.  For instance, a ton of Shaw Brothers martial-art flicks have been released in *HD* on iTunes, Amazon, and Youtube.  Good luck waiting for Blu-rays for those titles.  They don't get or may never get Blu-ray releases even in their native Hong Kong.  Among western films, there are several Hitchcock silent films that are available for HD streaming, but no Blu-rays.  Then you have 20th Century Fox that celebrated its 100th anniversary by releasing 100 titles only digitally.  That's just at the top of my head; there are a lot more.  Just sign up Netflix for a month and you will find untold number of films and TV shows in HD streaming but not on Blu-ray and never will be.  I'm not telling you to give up discs, since I still buy lots of discs myself.  But DON'T IGNORE STREAMING just because of some silly personal principles.  Have an open mind and you will only benefit yourself, instead of limiting yourself only to discs, which will only result in you having fewer chances to see certain movies than you would otherwise.
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Topic Replies: 56, Topic Views: 4935
Quoting DJViking:
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The application has not been updated since 2015. It lack support for UHD (though I see there is a beta with that feature). I was thinking going over to MyMovies because they have an updated desktop application (though not as nice like DVDProfiler).

Also Invelos should think of rebranding the application name. DVD is so in the past. Movie Profiler (or Media Profiler) would suit it much better.


I gave up on DVDP longer ago, and now use my own methods to catalog my collection.  As you can see, some of the people here are too old-school just like DVDP's creator, Mr. Ken Cole.  Regarding the infrequent updates, it has always been like this since way back.  Maybe this thing is not Mr. Cole's day job.  This is a niche product that serves a niche purpose for a niche population, so it would be foolish for anyone doing this for a living.  But more to the point, even if there were frequent updates, DVDP still has a lot of flaws that are so fundamentally unsound that no fix would be possible without a major redesign of the software.  Well, that was why I ditched DVDP and did it my way, adding all the features I wanted that DVDP would never have.

The prime flaw in DVDP is that its database structure is set up to work only for one movie per disc.  If a disc has more than one movie, you have issues.  If a disc has supplements that you want to catalog, you have issues.  DVDP is a *disc-based* catalog instead of a *title-based* catalog like IMDb.  DVDP really should have a title-based database too, plus a disc-based database that pulls in titles from the title database.  I now have my own movie database that is title-based, and it group titles together as "a disc" only when needed.  That gives me so much more flexibility in organization, and a lot of benefits as well.  One benefit of having a title-based database is that I only have to enter cast and crew for a movie ONCE.  In DVDP, as you know, for every different disc editions of a movie, you have enter cast and crew for each edition separately.  That adds such a chore in doing these multiple entries.  And that brings up the next point.

My own database not only does not need duplicate cast and crew entries, but it also downloads cast and crew from IMDb *automatically* via programmed scripts.  I just sit there while it downloads data for hundreds of movies, while DVDP users have to enter them manually one by one.  It's no wonder one of the most popular DVDP's plugins is this "Cast and Crew Edit" plugin (look how long the thread is), which lets you grab IMDb cast and crew and put it right into DVDP.  Still, it only grabs one title's cast and crew at a time, and you have to manually tell it what title to grab every time.  If you have hundreds of titles, it is still too much time.  Some of you can scoff at IMDb all you want, but the fact is many of you use Cast and Crew Edit to save time, and that means you rely on IMDb as much as anyone, and you know full well what the problem is just like I do: DVDP's contributors simply can't keep up with the workload, leaving behind lots of entries with BLANK or incomplete cast and crew.  Do you know that you have *ten-year-old* entries that still have no cast and crew filled in??  If I were Ken Cole, I would try to set up a business deal with IMDb so DVDP contributors would be allowed to use IMDb data.  Many of you are ALREADY using IMDb data, aren't you??  But the contributors can't because of legal reasons.  If they could, it would be the GAME-CHANGER you all need.  The database would be a lot more complete, since contributions could be done much faster.  Ask yourself, what do you have a catalog for?  To LOOK UP stuff.  How can you look up stuff if half the stuff isn't even in your catalog because it is so incomplete?? 

The above reasons and myriad other minor issues (no unicode, no meaningful cloud features, etc.) are what made me create my catalog.  I use Microsoft Access to create a database that stores ALL my movie discs, digital movies, games, DVR recordings, VHS, laserdiscs, etc, in a manner that gives me the greatest flexibility and organization.  I speed up data entry by using a set of programmed scripts called IMDbPY to download IMDb data automatically, as I mentioned.  It takes only TEN SECONDS to download all cast and crew for each title.  I also get ALL of Leonard Maltin's reviews into my database as well (I bought the ebooks, copied and pasted all the reviews into Word, then programmatically put them into my Access database).  I do rely on DVDP for one thing: the disc cover pictures.  But sadly, they are also very much incomplete, and I often have to find the pictures myself.

So my point to every frustrated DVDP users out there is that if you are serious about having a half-way decent catalog, then consider taking matters into your hands.  If you have database and programming knowledge like I do, it is a no-brainer: do it yourself!  Forget about finding another software to replace DVDP.  DVDP is already the "best" of its kind, and we all know it is nowhere close to being adequate.
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Topic Replies: 56, Topic Views: 4935
Invelos Forums->Posts by movie_madness Page: 1  Previous   Next